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Harpephyllum Caffrum
Harpephyllum Caffrum
18 JUNE 2018
Which trees should you be planting in this dry climate? TreeCo will be concentrating on the Harpephyllum caffrum. We really like the Wild plum due to the speed of growth and find them very hardy and wind resistant, a must for Cape Town and surrounds. Even though they do not have an aggressive root system, care should be taken as to where they are planted as they can grow into large specimens. They will create a lovely full and lush crown and their fruit will attract mousebirds, Cape parrots, barbets and a various fruit eating species. If there are children around, you won’t need to worry if they decide to eat the fruit, as these sour fruits are also used for jams and jellies. Get creative and find a nice recipe.
Frost is not their friend, but if you are in a light frost area look after the tree for a few years while small. Alternatively, plant a bigger specimen. A clay soil type or rather non-draining soil is not the best area for them. They can easily be mistaken for the Ekebergia capensis aka Cape ash but we prefer the Wildplum for its faster growing qualities. If you want to spot the difference quickly, look at the lighter colour bark. Look to the Wild plum as a great option for these drying times.
Treeco's Big 6
Treeco's Big 6
12 MAY 2018
TreeCo’s favourite trees for these dry times is a list of 6. Erythrina caffra, Ficus natalensis, Harpephyllum caffrum, Olea africana, Syzygium cordatum, Syzygium guineense. If you look at this list you will soon notice that not many of these are really suited to small and medium sized landscapes. Due to either size when fully grown, or their aggressive root systems.
So that really only leaves the Syzygium guineense aka Waterpear. We love this tree as after the settling in period (first summer of being watered) they should be able to be self-sufficient, with minimal need for watering. Clients have also had huge success with the Waterpear in challenging areas like Sunningdale, Bloubergstrand and Campsbay. So, wind, whilst challenging, is also not too much of a hinderance. In urban environments they make great screens when planted as a hedge as well as a sound barrier. They react very well to pruning so you can shape the tree very well to create a lovely form or create a nice shade tree, which comes naturally due to the thick foliage. As they are not known for an aggressive root system they can be used in smaller gardens, where their whitish bark adds something different. Birds and insects are also naturally drawn to the flowers of the Waterpear.
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