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A few simple tips on how to care for trees
A few simple tips on how to care for trees
10 FEBRUARY 2015
Your tree has found it’s forever home in your lovely garden, but once it has been planted, you need to know how to care for it. Here are some simple but handy tips...

The tree will need to be watered at least 2 to 3 times per week during the dry season. A deep watered tree will become self-sustained sooner and grow more vigorous than a shallow watered tree.

The amount of water will depend on your soil type and how well or poorly it retains water. The soil should stay moist.

If you live in a windy area, it is advisable to stake your tree while it settles and anchors itself in the ground.

You will need to feed your tree, but stay away from fertilizers and rather opt for earthworm tea and compost mulch every 3 months, where possible.

Lastly, refrain from pruning your tree in the first year, as it settles into it’s environment.

Happy Gardening!
Alien invasion
Alien invasion
3 SEPTEMBER 2014
You've entertained the idea of a few changes around the garden. Now you've read our handy tips to get Spring ready and your mind is set. You are going for it!

A fair warning dear gardener. Aliens are among us and they do not (always) come in peace. Choosing a wrong tree for your home can have dire long term consequences on your property.
Alien invasive species (not a Saffa) have a huge negative impact on our South African environment. Bad stuff. Long story short, alien invasive can be put into 3 categories in South Africa.

Category 1: The alien "take-me-to-your" leader. Invader plants must be removed and destroyed immediately.

Category 2: Invader plants must be grown under controlled conditions only.

Category 3: Invader plants that may not be planted anymore. Be aware and make sure to stay proudly South African.
Arbor week
Arbor week
1 SEPTEMBER 2015
It’s National Arbor Week from 1-7 September so we call on all South Africans to plant indigenous trees as a practical and symbolic gesture of sustainable environmental management. What makes this week so important to us is the fact that it affords the government, the private sector, non-governmental and community based organisations and the public an opportune time to be actively involved in improving local communities through urban greening.

Throughout history, the public join hands with partners in local government and community-based organisations during Arbor Week, so if you have the initiative but not the know-how, give Rudi a call on 082 829 5543 for recommendations on which trees are best to plant in your area. As you know, in South Africa, townships and informal settlements specifically need greening because of ill planning in the past. Ordering a handful of trees from us this Arbor Week can make all the difference in the future.
Bad trees happen to good people: make an informed decision when buying new trees
Bad trees happen to good people: make an informed decision when buying new trees
8 APRIL 2015
As you know, choosing the wrong tree for your (or your client’s) home can have devastating effects. Just one wrong decision can have dire long term consequences on the property and its value. Some questions you should ask while shopping for trees are: Will the lawn grow beneath it? Will the roots crack the swimming pool? Will the kids be poisoned if they eat the leaves or chew on the twigs? All of these questions need to be answered before you purchase, but where does one start in the decision making process?

Firstly, start by understanding the classification of ‘alien invasive species’:

Category 1: Invader plants that must be removed and destroyed immediately. If you have these on your property, get rid of them as soon as possible.

Category 2: Invader plants must be grown under controlled conditions only. No permits will be issued for these species.

Category 3: Invader plants that may not be planted anymore. You will not be required to remove these if they are already on your property.

Alien invasive species have a huge, negative impact on the South African environment because of devastating effects on all components of biological diversity. Ask us to assist you in choosing the best trees for your property before one bad tree spoils the soil and your garden.
Berms – what they do and how we use them
Berms – what they do and how we use them
7 MAY 2015
In the modern world, a berm is a raised, earthen barrier built in a natural environment. The word, ‘berm’, has its origins in the Middle Dutch and German, ‘berme’, from medieval times when berms were used by military engineers as a geological strategy performing functions beyond the battlefield. These varied functions are so versatile, berms have been trending the landscape scene for centuries.

Commonly used as a component of a floodwater storage system, berms work as a slope length reducer, they reduce the size of outlet pipes required and minimise the peak flow occurring further down in the watershed. In these instances, berms are categorised as floodwater collectors or deflectors.

Other uses of berms are for geothermal heating in earth berm homes (it’s true, berms are so awesome people actually live in them), storm resistance, creation of more usable land, and, most importantly, good ol’ peace and quiet. Berms are perfect for properties with noisy neighbours as they act as noise barriers that can create a peaceful sanctuary and provide extra privacy.
Cape Green Forum in Spring
Cape Green Forum in Spring
16 AUGUST 2016
It's Cape Green Forum time again and TreeCo will be there on the 24th of August. We’re looking forward to meeting up with you again. In a nutshell, for those who don't know, The Cape Green Forum was formed in 1999 to connect growers, retailers, landscapers, estate managers, irrigation specialists and other suppliers to the green industry in the Cape.

On Trade Day, we usually set up a dense mini forest which features TreeCo's diversity of stock and superior quality of viable and reliable trees. Younger developers can expand their knowledge of TreeCo's varieties within species, affording clients with different soil types equal aesthetics. More traditional landscapers will enjoy our new stock section and possibly even catch a glimpse of every South African garden's super star, Keith Kirsten.
Change With the Seasons
Change With the Seasons
5 MAY 2016
After April's much needed bouts of rain it's time to add that extra bit of organic food to your trees' feeding process; please do bear in mind that less is more when fertilising. As you have also noticed, the seasons are busy changing so constant watering of your garden is no longer necessary as the cooler temperatures will keep your watering area moist for much longer. With the upcoming winter showers we would like to reassure you that, come rain or shine, TreeCo trees get to where they're going!
Drought-Proof your Garden
Drought-Proof your Garden
15 DECEMBER 2016
Please remember that we are under strict water restrictions this summer, which means you cannot water your grounds as freely as you may wish to. Place an additional layer of mulch on your flower beds to reduce evaporation of the soil's moisture and reuse water from the house in your garden. Installing more permanent greywater solutions are advised.

It is also advisable to use less fertiliser, refrain from pruning your shrubs and trees, and move potted plants into shadier areas. You can get up to speed on the restrictions with City of Cape Town's website as well as keep tabs on the water restrictions through News24.
Fancy a cuppa (earthworm) tea?
Fancy a cuppa (earthworm) tea?
4 AUGUST 2015
While soil is a medium that supports plants and stores the nutrients necessary for plant growth and development, the choice of soil makes a substantial difference to how plants thrive. As we all know, microbes play an important role in improving soil fertility, and today the secrets to the ultimate soil conditions are all too easily found in the form of chemical compounds. But what about a cup of earthworm-pooh tea in your pot plant?

Vermicompost, the end product of an earthworm meal (yes, earthworm pooh), not only dramatically increases plant growth and yield, but also suppresses diseases, parasitic nematodes and arthropod pests. Vermicompost maintains high levels of microbial activity, which produces invaluable plant compounds such as growth hormones, plant growth regulators, and soluble nutrients. Vermicompost is also easier to transport and apply to crops than other types of fertilizers, and plants love it almost as much as we do.
Feeding Time
Feeding Time
12 APRIL 2016
The season is changing and it’s a good idea to add some spice to your trees’ feeding regime. A little bit of organic fertiliser would be enough to give your tree that much needed boost after the hard and dry summer days we’ve had. You can make your own organic fertiliser at home with combinations of these key ingredients: banana peels, coffee grounds, eggshells, seaweed, molasses, grass clippings, dog food and good old-fashioned cow poop.
As you know, different plants thrive on different nutrient combinations so drop us a line on 021 864 3046 for advice or to order some of our ready-made fertiliser (much faster).
You are awesome!